Posted by: Stevie D | December 9, 2012

Humilladero.

Firstly, apologies dear readers for the long delay in posting. Jayney and I have been travelling home and internet has been a scarce commodity on the way. Here though,at last, is the latest part of our ongoing tale.

From Abanilla we cut back to the coast and stayed a couple of days at a campsite near Almeria where we had stayed on our very first holiday together. Back then, the owner had said it hadn’t rained in 8 years on his campsite. This time it hardly stopped for two days so on the third, we moved.

We cut back inland to a small town just west of Antequera called Humilladero. The town itself was nothing out of the ordinary, although the Andalucian white towns all have a charm of their own. The campsite was excellent, although weirdly situated on the edge of a housing estate without any houses. Roads, streetlights, pavements, litter bins, everything in place but buildings. What made Humilladero such a great place to stay, however, was what was around it and the superb road network which joined them all together. We also enjoyed a few days of good weather which enabled us to get full value from riding in this beautiful part of Andalucia.

Standing high above Antequera is El Torcal,one of Europes best examples of a ‘Karst’ landscape. We rode up it one sunny day and took in the views across Andalucias olive groves sprinkled with white towns. If you’re in the area, it’s well worth the trip.

We took a break on the way up.

We took a break on the way up.

It wasn't easy to get a clear shot of the amazing scenery.

It wasn’t easy to get a clear shot of the amazing scenery.

The elaborate erosion of the rocks is typical of karst areas.

The elaborate erosion of the rocks is typical of karst areas.

The trip down was one of those you don't want to end.

The trip down was one of those you don’t want to end.

I love Spain.

I love Spain.

Apologies for my head sneaking in at the bottom there.

Apologies for my head sneaking in at the bottom there.

We passed by the historic town of Antequera, with it's 14th century fort, the Alcazaba.

We passed by the historic town of Antequera, with it’s 14th century fort, the Alcazaba.

The riding in the area was truly superb. One day we rode in a big circle for four hours, stopping only to refuel, through seemingly endless olive groves and the occasional typical white town. We didn’t need to stop along the way as the pleasure, on that day at least, was simply the road, the bike and the warm autumn sun.

On another day we visited the nature reserve at Fuente de Piedra. It is unusual in being an inland, salt water lake and is home to the largest colony of Pink Flamingoes in Spain.

Looking across the Laguna de Fuente de Piedra at the town which shares its name.

Looking across the Laguna de Fuente de Piedra at the town which shares its name.

We also had a ride down to the historic town of Teba. Draped across a hilltop like a sheet, its steeply sloping streets made a fascinating place to spend a few hours of exploration.

Looking across the rooftops  of the town of Teba.

Looking across the rooftops of the town of Teba.

A view of the Andalucian countryside and the twisty road up to Teba.

A view of the Andalucian countryside and the twisty road up to Teba.

Teba's steep streets and stairways took their toll on these ageing legs.

Teba’s steep streets and stairways took their toll on these ageing legs.

While we were staying at Humilladero, we booked our boat home to England. After this, although physically we were still travelling, I think psychologically we were simply heading home. The curtains were being drawn on our amazing year and what came after wouldn’t feel quite the same somehow.

Still at least one more post to come though, about the long road home. Thanks to you all for following.

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Responses

  1. It’s been great reading about the journey Stevie….Taking a whoole year out to do this is fantastic…roll on retirement lol…I can’t wait for 2014 and a month out of the diary to travel accross the USA on my own machine!

    • Now that, Thornton, is living a dream a lot of people have.

  2. From the looks of the eroded rocks, you were near Montserrat?

    • Yeah, there are many sites around the world with the ‘Karst’ form of erosion. It’s a striking sight to see.

  3. Hey, just trying to confirm your comment on 4th official, but having slight issues. Thought I’d check out your blog, really stunning views, I hope I get the opportunity to go on such a journey 🙂 Great posts.


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